turner4D | Carpe Colloquium

 

Wired’s reporting on Pew Research Center’s recent poll about how people get their news in the modern era raises some very interesting questions about what it means to “get your news from social media”. What strikes the reader immediately is that there are two headlines for two seemingly contradictory conclusions drawn from the study: HEADLINE 1:  People Don’t See Social Media as an ‘Important’ News Source HEADLINE 2: Facebook and Twitter Are Where People Are Getting Their News That these posts draw seemingly different conclusions from the same report indicates the need to deconstruct the research and reporting on social media. While reliance on Twitter and Facebook for tracking the news is on the rise, the majority of Americans still use other media to get most of their news. In an earlier column, I challenged researchers to dig deeper into how people use social media. Instead of just identifying which social media channels people use, we need to know more about how they use different social media channels. To this end, I applaud Pew for doing just that – this study looks at the extent to which people use social media to get news. That said, we need to go even deeper. To illustrate why,…

Posted by Alan Rosenblatt in Social Advocacy & Politics, Social Media Read More

What makes a good online advocacy platform? The world of online advocacy has changed much since the early days in the mid-1990’s. We’ve evolved from the first custom build-outs from CTSG. That was quickly followed by the first off-the-shelf platform for online advocacy, Capwiz; launched in 1996 by Capitol Advantage. Since then, we’ve seen greater power in targeting emails to activists, customizing messages to Members of Congress based on their behavior (votes, sponsorships, committee assignments, etc.) and some social media integration. The fact that social media integration has been limited is of concern. We know that social media is how an increasing number of people find their news. We also know that essentially all Members of Congress are on Facebook and Twitter, significant numbers of state and local lawmakers use social media, as well as many policy experts and members of the press. We know that when people learn about politics from their friends, there is a good chance that friend got their information via social media. And we know that lawmakers are paying attention to social media to better understand their constituents’ needs and desires. And yet, when it comes to software platforms for advocacy campaigns, most simply incorporate…

Governor Scott Walker of Wisconsin announced yesterday that he is running for the GOP nomination in the 2016 Presidential race.  Walker received an intense reaction on Facebook from his supporters, second only to Ted Cruz.  The up-swell yesterday of social media activity on Walker’s Facebook page was impressive, however he lagged in total Facebook engagements on launch day when compared to fellow candidates Hillary Clinton, Ted Cruz and Donald Trump. Alan Rosenblatt, turner4D’s Senior Vice President of Digital Strategy, was quoted this morning in USA Today regarding the number of Facebook page engagements garnered from Walker’s announcement: “It should not be used without the context of absolute volume, but it does measure intensity of his audience.” It is always best to consider both factors when comparing Facebook impact. Context is key! Check out the chart below to view the stats ranking candidates’ launch-day engagement numbers on Facebook.  Read more from the article quoting Alan here.  

Posted by Lauryn Gutierrez in Social Media Read More

The city of Tulsa, OK has opened up its decision making process to its citizens to help decide how it should spend funds generated by extending the expiring Vision 2015 tax to 2025. City officials are collecting pitches this month for ideas on how to spend the approximately $300 million the extension would generate via social media (using the hashtag #VisionTulsa), email and public meetings. This campaign has the potential to dramatically increase the public’s trust in its city government, but how much depends on how responsive the government is to the proffered ideas. The more governments create opportunities for the public to participate in the development of policy and the allocation of budgets, the more the people feel that government is responsive to their needs and desires — political efficacy. But while any opportunity to bring the public into the decision making process is good, the best opportunity comes from making the public’s collective decision on how to spend the budget (even a small part of it, as in this case) binding. And the benefits to the city from this effort, should it make the public’s desires binding, is more than just improved efficacy. According to research by Tiago…

Posted by Alan Rosenblatt in Social Media Read More

This past week we witnessed two failed #Ask hashtag campaigns: #AskBobby and #AskELJames. For those unfamiliar with these campaigns, #AskBobby was for newly announced GOP presidential candidate Governor Bobby Jindal (LA) and #AskELJames was for the author of Fifty Shades of Grey. If you think for a minute or two, you should be able to see quite vividly in your mind’s eye what went wrong and, hopefully, what needed to be done to make them successes. For E.L. James, author of the popular book made into blockbuster movie about an edgy BDSM affair, the questions submitted via the #AskELJames hashtag were entirely predictable. Questions ranging from lewd propositions to asking her why she is glorifying domestic abuse exploded across Twitter in the lead up to her June 29 chat. For Bobby Jindal, his #AskBobby campaign came upon the heels of a ridiculed announcement that he was running and comments he made regarding getting rid of the Supreme Court. As a result, Jindal solicited questions via Twitter at a time when he was being lampooned on the late night talk shows. The results were also predictable, as Jindal drew questions about his Americanized name, whether his call to eliminate the Supreme Court was…

Posted by Alan Rosenblatt in Social Advocacy & Politics Read More