turner4D | Carpe Colloquium

 

Governor Scott Walker of Wisconsin announced yesterday that he is running for the GOP nomination in the 2016 Presidential race.  Walker received an intense reaction on Facebook from his supporters, second only to Ted Cruz.  The up-swell yesterday of social media activity on Walker’s Facebook page was impressive, however he lagged in total Facebook engagements on launch day when compared to fellow candidates Hillary Clinton, Ted Cruz and Donald Trump. Alan Rosenblatt, turner4D’s Senior Vice President of Digital Strategy, was quoted this morning in USA Today regarding the number of Facebook page engagements garnered from Walker’s announcement: “It should not be used without the context of absolute volume, but it does measure intensity of his audience.” It is always best to consider both factors when comparing Facebook impact. Context is key! Check out the chart below to view the stats ranking candidates’ launch-day engagement numbers on Facebook.  Read more from the article quoting Alan here.  

Posted by Lauryn Gutierrez in Social Media Read More

The city of Tulsa, OK has opened up its decision making process to its citizens to help decide how it should spend funds generated by extending the expiring Vision 2015 tax to 2025. City officials are collecting pitches this month for ideas on how to spend the approximately $300 million the extension would generate via social media (using the hashtag #VisionTulsa), email and public meetings. This campaign has the potential to dramatically increase the public’s trust in its city government, but how much depends on how responsive the government is to the proffered ideas. The more governments create opportunities for the public to participate in the development of policy and the allocation of budgets, the more the people feel that government is responsive to their needs and desires — political efficacy. But while any opportunity to bring the public into the decision making process is good, the best opportunity comes from making the public’s collective decision on how to spend the budget (even a small part of it, as in this case) binding. And the benefits to the city from this effort, should it make the public’s desires binding, is more than just improved efficacy. According to research by Tiago…

Posted by Alan Rosenblatt in Social Media Read More

This past week we witnessed two failed #Ask hashtag campaigns: #AskBobby and #AskELJames. For those unfamiliar with these campaigns, #AskBobby was for newly announced GOP presidential candidate Governor Bobby Jindal (LA) and #AskELJames was for the author of Fifty Shades of Grey. If you think for a minute or two, you should be able to see quite vividly in your mind’s eye what went wrong and, hopefully, what needed to be done to make them successes. For E.L. James, author of the popular book made into blockbuster movie about an edgy BDSM affair, the questions submitted via the #AskELJames hashtag were entirely predictable. Questions ranging from lewd propositions to asking her why she is glorifying domestic abuse exploded across Twitter in the lead up to her June 29 chat. For Bobby Jindal, his #AskBobby campaign came upon the heels of a ridiculed announcement that he was running and comments he made regarding getting rid of the Supreme Court. As a result, Jindal solicited questions via Twitter at a time when he was being lampooned on the late night talk shows. The results were also predictable, as Jindal drew questions about his Americanized name, whether his call to eliminate the Supreme Court was…

Posted by Alan Rosenblatt in Social Advocacy & Politics Read More

Who you are plays a big role in what you can, and cannot, get away with on social media. This past weekend, Judy Mozes, the wife of Israeli Interior Minister, tweeted a racist joke about President Obama. The tweet caused uproar across Twitter and across both countries. People objected to both the racism of the tweet and the potential damage it could do to US-Israeli relations. Mozes’ tweet and the reaction to it highlight several potential social media pitfalls. First, when posting on social media, especially on Twitter, you are always talking to more people than you intended. You may intend to direct your comment at a particular person or group, but your posts are always going to be seen by unintended audiences. Second, what may seem appropriate to you may not always be appropriate to others. For example, when a politician in the Chesapeake Bay region tweets he is looking forward to getting crabs over the weekend, local constituents think yummy crustaceans, while folks in other parts of the country may think STD. So, a tweet about “Obama coffee” being “black and weak,” while clearly offensive, may be seen as far more so by some people than others, as…

Posted by Alan Rosenblatt in Social Advocacy & Politics, Uncategorized Read More

Central to any communications strategy is setting up the capacity to identify opportunities and crises in the media as early as possible. Being able to get out ahead of the pack on an issue requires knowing when that issue is breaking in the media. In recent years, social media has become the harbinger of breaking news, often outpacing mainstream news by a day or more. Driving the narrative of a breaking story in the media hinges on finding the story quickly and proactively shaping it. Given this reality, turner4D has developed an early warning monitoring methodology to help us keep our clients ahead of the pack. Human Intelligence is Enhanced with the Right Tools and Sources While tools alone can never replace the value of human intelligence, they can certainly provide us with the raw data we need to synthesize into actionable intelligence. Using a handful of monitoring tools we can catch early signs of crises and emerging victories, often before other major actors in the field. For example, during the delivery of the Supreme Court’s decision on the Affordable Care Act, all of the major news media outlets were stationed on the steps of the courthouse. Each had their…

Posted by Alan Rosenblatt in Service Offerings Read More