Social Advocacy & Politics

 

One of the biggest criticisms of the current presidential election campaigns is that the candidates’ ability to entertain trumps their command and discussion of the issues. As this story goes, image appears to matter more than the ability to lead the “free world.” That is what is being said, but is it really true? Have presidential elections degenerated into White House Idol? Are we in danger of nominating Sanjaya for President? The latest trigger for this critique, Donald Trump’s hosting of Saturday Night Live this past weekend, is not something new to presidential politics. Hillary Clinton has appeared more than once on the show since the launch of her 2016 campaign. During the 2012 campaign, President Obama appeared on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon to “Slow Jam” the news. During the 1992 campaign, Bill Clinton played his saxophone on the Arsenio Hall Show. Even Richard Nixon appeared on Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In in 1968 to deliver the show’s signature punch-line, “Sock it to me.” These pop culture appearances by presidential candidates, challengers and incumbents alike, are nothing new. But while these appearances initially relied on the reach of the television shows where the candidates appeared and the subsequent reach of…

Posted by Alan Rosenblatt in Social Advocacy & Politics Read More

For many years I have been pushing my colleagues to more fully integrate social media into their advocacy campaigns. While many were using social media to raise awareness about their issues and mobilize activists to take action (with both direct social media appeals and peer-to-peer appeals to send emails to Congress), none were using social media itself to deliver the messages to lawmakers. In 2010 I trained some of my colleagues to use social media to deliver messages to lawmakers, encouraging them to pass specific legislation. That resulted in the ENOUGH Project successfully passing two pieces of legislation that year by mobilizing its activists to post directly on key legislators Facebook pages. In the years since, “social advocacy” has become more common, though still not pervasive. But when it is used, it yields great results. Read a personal story from long-time advocacy organizer Shelley Moskowitz about how she and her team used Twitter in the eleventh hour to catch the attention of a senator and save their campaign in Alan’s post at Social Media Today. __ Alan Rosenblatt, Ph.D. is Sr. VP of Digital Strategy at turner4D and a 20+ year veteran of digital politics.  He writes every other Tuesday for Social Media Today, where…

The search for the Grail has consumed many a person over the past two thousand years, both fictional and real, so much so that “searching for the Grail” has become a meme more universal than even naming every American political scandal “-gate.” What makes the search for the Grail such a powerful meme is its combination of being a lofty goal that no one has yet achieved. In the world of social advocacy and politics, in my opinion, the so-called Grail is the ability to fully understand the downstream influence of your campaign’s social network. When Buzzfeed announced its new analytics technology last April, POUND, I thought, for a moment, that they had found the Grail I seek. Not quite. That is not to say that POUND is a failure; quite the contrary. POUND is a stunning advance in social media metrics. But it does not go as far as I would like. To read more of Alan’s analysis of POUND, please see his article in Social Media Today. __ Alan Rosenblatt, Ph.D. is Sr. VP of Digital Strategy at turner4D and a 20+ year veteran of digital politics.  He writes every other Tuesday for Social Media Today, where this post originally appeared.

Posted by Alan Rosenblatt in Social Advocacy & Politics, Social Media Read More

With Scott Walker’s exit from the GOP presidential race, USA Today chose to feature its four-week-old GOP Power Rankings on the front page. The rankings, as we have reported earlier, comprises the votes of 30 political experts, among them turner4D’s own SVP of Digital Strategy Alan Rosenblatt, Ph.D. Alan has been basing his votes each week, to a large degree, on the candidates’ social media performance. Last week, Alan predicted that Scott Walker’s days were numbered based on his precipitous drop in Facebook engagements over the past couple of weeks. The top editor at USA Today agreed that there was something very interesting going on and that the GOP Power Rankings deserved a higher profile, specifically the front page of both the print and online editions today (September 9, 2015). Alan joins 29 other experts each week as they rank the GOP candidates for USA Today. See the image below for a full list of the political experts voting on the rankings and check in each Tuesday for the latest results at USA Today’s OnPolitics.   __ Alan Rosenblatt, Ph.D., is the Senior Vice President of Digital Strategy at turner4D.  

Candidate buzz on social media and in search engines has emerged as an interesting metric for gaging how well the campaigns are doing. Back in 2008, for example, while the last opinion poll in the field predicted that Barack Obama would win the New Hampshire primary, Yahoo Buzz correctly predicted Hillary Clinton would win. Unlike the polls, which were wrapped up by the Sunday before the Tuesday vote, Yahoo was able to measure the number of searches for Clinton up until the polls opened. Even after removing searches for Hillary crying in the diner, which Yahoo assumed included a lot of people who thought Hillary was faking the tears, she had such an uptick in search queries that helped the Buzz Index predict her victory.  Since then, more attention has rightfully focused on the levels of online buzz about candidates as a measure of how well their campaigns are doing. Read more about the GOP candidates’ current standings – as measured by the intensity of citizen engagement with them on Facebook – in the rest of Alan’s post at Social Media Today. — Alan Rosenblatt, Ph.D. is Sr. VP of Digital Strategy at turner4D and a 20+ year veteran of digital politics….

Posted by Alan Rosenblatt in Social Advocacy & Politics Read More