Social Advocacy & Politics

 

With rare exceptions, if you Google a political candidate you’ll get a link to his or her Wikipedia page among the top five results. Certainly this is true for the presidential candidates, and certainly we can all understand why they should be extremely concerned about what’s said about them there. And while there is great motivation for candidates to either modify their entries themselves, direct their staff to do so or hire an editorial consultant, all of these actions are frowned upon by Wikipedia’s editorial policy. As a result, “black hat” Wikipedia editors have proliferated, much to the consternation of Wikipedia. But there’s also been a rise in “white hat” paid Wikipedia consultants; along with an effort to organize them and establish a code of ethics to convince Wikipedia that these “white hats” fit into the spirit of Wikipedia’s mission. Read the rest of Alan’s post at Social Media Today.   __ Alan Rosenblatt, Ph.D. is Sr. VP of Digital Strategy at turner4D.  He writes every other Tuesday for Social Media Today, where this post originally appeared.

Posted by Alan Rosenblatt in Social Advocacy & Politics Read More

Wired’s reporting on Pew Research Center’s recent poll about how people get their news in the modern era raises some very interesting questions about what it means to “get your news from social media”. What strikes the reader immediately is that there are two headlines for two seemingly contradictory conclusions drawn from the study: HEADLINE 1:  People Don’t See Social Media as an ‘Important’ News Source HEADLINE 2: Facebook and Twitter Are Where People Are Getting Their News That these posts draw seemingly different conclusions from the same report indicates the need to deconstruct the research and reporting on social media. While reliance on Twitter and Facebook for tracking the news is on the rise, the majority of Americans still use other media to get most of their news. In an earlier column, I challenged researchers to dig deeper into how people use social media. Instead of just identifying which social media channels people use, we need to know more about how they use different social media channels. To this end, I applaud Pew for doing just that – this study looks at the extent to which people use social media to get news. That said, we need to go even deeper. To illustrate why,…

Posted by Alan Rosenblatt in Social Advocacy & Politics, Social Media Read More

This past week we witnessed two failed #Ask hashtag campaigns: #AskBobby and #AskELJames. For those unfamiliar with these campaigns, #AskBobby was for newly announced GOP presidential candidate Governor Bobby Jindal (LA) and #AskELJames was for the author of Fifty Shades of Grey. If you think for a minute or two, you should be able to see quite vividly in your mind’s eye what went wrong and, hopefully, what needed to be done to make them successes. For E.L. James, author of the popular book made into blockbuster movie about an edgy BDSM affair, the questions submitted via the #AskELJames hashtag were entirely predictable. Questions ranging from lewd propositions to asking her why she is glorifying domestic abuse exploded across Twitter in the lead up to her June 29 chat. For Bobby Jindal, his #AskBobby campaign came upon the heels of a ridiculed announcement that he was running and comments he made regarding getting rid of the Supreme Court. As a result, Jindal solicited questions via Twitter at a time when he was being lampooned on the late night talk shows. The results were also predictable, as Jindal drew questions about his Americanized name, whether his call to eliminate the Supreme Court was…

Posted by Alan Rosenblatt in Social Advocacy & Politics Read More

Who you are plays a big role in what you can, and cannot, get away with on social media. This past weekend, Judy Mozes, the wife of Israeli Interior Minister, tweeted a racist joke about President Obama. The tweet caused uproar across Twitter and across both countries. People objected to both the racism of the tweet and the potential damage it could do to US-Israeli relations. Mozes’ tweet and the reaction to it highlight several potential social media pitfalls. First, when posting on social media, especially on Twitter, you are always talking to more people than you intended. You may intend to direct your comment at a particular person or group, but your posts are always going to be seen by unintended audiences. Second, what may seem appropriate to you may not always be appropriate to others. For example, when a politician in the Chesapeake Bay region tweets he is looking forward to getting crabs over the weekend, local constituents think yummy crustaceans, while folks in other parts of the country may think STD. So, a tweet about “Obama coffee” being “black and weak,” while clearly offensive, may be seen as far more so by some people than others, as…

Posted by Alan Rosenblatt in Social Advocacy & Politics, Uncategorized Read More

WASHINGTON__Science and religion seem to be coming together on environmental issues in a way that could transform the debate over climate change and energize advocates, just as the U.S presidential campaign heats up. In his first “teaching letter,” called an encyclical, Pope Francis cuts to the heart of a debate over climate change – which has drawn sharp ideological battle lines between those who say it’s simply cyclical weather patterns and those who attribute it to pollutants. Reiterating a statement from earlier in the year, Francis writes in the encyclical that climate change is a man-made phenomenon that could “result in the destruction of the ecosystem. “Numerous scientific studies indicate that most of the global warming of the past decades is due to the concentration of greenhouse gases emitted especially because of human activities.” Read Pope Francis’ 192-page encyclical on climate change. And in anticipation of the Pope’s encyclical, the Italian environmental group Observatorio do Clima released a video this week that presents the Pope in an interesting new light on environmental issues. Francis, an Argentinean and the first Pope from the developing world, focuses in his encyclical on the impact climate change has on people living in poverty, and calls…

Posted by Sid Balman in Social Advocacy & Politics Read More