Social Media

 

For many years I have been pushing my colleagues to more fully integrate social media into their advocacy campaigns. While many were using social media to raise awareness about their issues and mobilize activists to take action (with both direct social media appeals and peer-to-peer appeals to send emails to Congress), none were using social media itself to deliver the messages to lawmakers. In 2010 I trained some of my colleagues to use social media to deliver messages to lawmakers, encouraging them to pass specific legislation. That resulted in the ENOUGH Project successfully passing two pieces of legislation that year by mobilizing its activists to post directly on key legislators Facebook pages. In the years since, “social advocacy” has become more common, though still not pervasive. But when it is used, it yields great results. Read a personal story from long-time advocacy organizer Shelley Moskowitz about how she and her team used Twitter in the eleventh hour to catch the attention of a senator and save their campaign in Alan’s post at Social Media Today. __ Alan Rosenblatt, Ph.D. is Sr. VP of Digital Strategy at turner4D and a 20+ year veteran of digital politics.  He writes every other Tuesday for Social Media Today, where…

The search for the Grail has consumed many a person over the past two thousand years, both fictional and real, so much so that “searching for the Grail” has become a meme more universal than even naming every American political scandal “-gate.” What makes the search for the Grail such a powerful meme is its combination of being a lofty goal that no one has yet achieved. In the world of social advocacy and politics, in my opinion, the so-called Grail is the ability to fully understand the downstream influence of your campaign’s social network. When Buzzfeed announced its new analytics technology last April, POUND, I thought, for a moment, that they had found the Grail I seek. Not quite. That is not to say that POUND is a failure; quite the contrary. POUND is a stunning advance in social media metrics. But it does not go as far as I would like. To read more of Alan’s analysis of POUND, please see his article in Social Media Today. __ Alan Rosenblatt, Ph.D. is Sr. VP of Digital Strategy at turner4D and a 20+ year veteran of digital politics.  He writes every other Tuesday for Social Media Today, where this post originally appeared.

Posted by Alan Rosenblatt in Social Advocacy & Politics, Social Media Read More

WASHINGTON__turner4D has been working behind the scenes for almost two years to develop and implement digital strategies for dealing with the rise of violent extremism. That quiet engagement will change Sept. 25-26 when Turner participates in a Washington conference at which technologists and peace practitioners collaborate on online tactics to counter the type of violent extremism that is ripping apart the Middle East and North Africa, while unleashing a flood of refugees unseen since the darkest days of World War II. Managing Director Sid Balman and Senior Vice President for Digital Strategy Alan Rosenblatt will lead Turner’s delegation at Peacehack DC, organized by Creative Associates International, a Washington-based international development organization. Peacehacks will also be held at the same time in Lebanon, Spain, Sri Lanka, Colombia and the United Kingdom. Mr. Balman will participate in a panel discussion that kicks off the event, along with Dara Katz, Deputy Executive Director of the U.S. Agency for International Development’s Secretariat for Countering Violent Extremism; Olive Wilcox, a deputy policy chief in the State Department’s Bureau of Counterterrorism; and Elizabeth Hume, senior director for Programs and Strategy at the Alliance For Peacebuilding. Paul Turner, a senior conflict advisor at Creative Associates, will moderate…

Posted by Sid Balman in Company News, Social Media Read More

Week 2 of USA Today’s power rankings for the GOP presidential candidates are out and, even more than last week, they track closely to the candidates social media buzz. Last week I provided an analysis of how much Facebook buzz the candidates were generating. You can see how well it tracked with the Week 1 Power Rankings in the page snap below. As one of the experts voting each week for the Power Rankings, my focus is to base my rankings on the candidates’ social media performance data. This week, the final Power Rankings almost perfectly match the growth of the candidates’ Twitter followings. The top six candidates in the USA Today Power Ranking are also the top six for Twitter growth. While we discourage relying predominantly on vanity statistics (like followers) alone for measuring social media impact, given that the early campaign season is a popularity contest, audience growth does matter. That said, we still need to keep in mind engagement metrics (in this case represented by Klout scores). This week’s follower growth numbers also track closely with those, too. Check back here over the course of the campaign for more updates and analyses like these. For my part,…

Posted by Alan Rosenblatt in Social Media Read More

Wired’s reporting on Pew Research Center’s recent poll about how people get their news in the modern era raises some very interesting questions about what it means to “get your news from social media”. What strikes the reader immediately is that there are two headlines for two seemingly contradictory conclusions drawn from the study: HEADLINE 1:  People Don’t See Social Media as an ‘Important’ News Source HEADLINE 2: Facebook and Twitter Are Where People Are Getting Their News That these posts draw seemingly different conclusions from the same report indicates the need to deconstruct the research and reporting on social media. While reliance on Twitter and Facebook for tracking the news is on the rise, the majority of Americans still use other media to get most of their news. In an earlier column, I challenged researchers to dig deeper into how people use social media. Instead of just identifying which social media channels people use, we need to know more about how they use different social media channels. To this end, I applaud Pew for doing just that – this study looks at the extent to which people use social media to get news. That said, we need to go even deeper. To illustrate why,…

Posted by Alan Rosenblatt in Social Advocacy & Politics, Social Media Read More