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Regardless of the project we work on here at turner4D, whether it leverages social, digital, earned, paid or any combination of these media, our goal is conversion. We always work with our clients to find out what their end goal is and develop strategy and tactics to get them there. In the spirit of prioritizing conversion to success, my latest column on Social Media Today is all about how Donald Trump is advancing the use of social media to convert voters into votes for The Donald. Historically, campaign consultants always evaluate tactics based on how many votes they can generate. Door knocking, phone banking, robo-calls and kissing babies are all justified based on their ability to generate votes for the candidate. While we still do not know the exact conversion rate for turning social media touches into votes, clearly the tactics works. Just look at how weak Donald Trump’s ground game has been so far and how successful he was in Iowa and New Hampshire and you will see that the conversion factor is real. For more of my thinking on converting social media touches to votes, read my full column on Social Media Today. Read more… —– Alan Rosenblatt,…

By Suzanne Turner, President, turner4D, and Alan Rosenblatt, Ph.D., Partner, turner4D With the myriad of social media channels and tools, news outlets, websites (yours and theirs), influencers and policymakers out there it is easy to get lost in the weeds; to focus so much on tactics that we lose our strategic way. Good strategic vision is the cornerstone of any effort to make the world a better place. That is why, first and foremost, turner4D works with our clients to develop their vision and create the right strategy for achieving it. Yes, we help our clients build out their enterprise-level capacity to implement these strategies. And yes, we help our clients identify which implementation tactics are best done in-house and which are best outsourced to experts (like us). But in the final analysis, none of these subsequent activities and decisions should be pursued without a developing a clear strategic vision first. When it comes to developing our clients’ vision and strategy, we pursue a rigorous, research-grounded approach that not only allows us to better understand our clients’ needs, but also helps our clients better understand their own needs. Using a combination of brainstorming workshops, staff and stakeholder interviews, audience/market surveys,…

Twitter’s clarification of its rules regarding the posting of threats and promotion of violence raises (again) two key questions regarding how we evaluate and respond to social media posts about the use of violence to pursue extremist goals. How do we differentiate between people talking about violent extremism and people promoting it? Is it better to ban promoters of violent extremism or monitor them for intelligence gathering? In the wake of Donald Trump suggesting that we should shut down parts of the Internet and our efforts to understand the San Bernardino attack, authorities and the public are looking to social media to try to make sense of its relationship to violent extremism. Read the remainder of Alan’s article at Social Media Today. __ Alan Rosenblatt, Ph.D. is Sr. VP of Digital Strategy at turner4D and a 20+ year veteran of digital politics.  He writes every other Tuesday for Social Media Today, where this post originally appeared.  

Posted by Alan Rosenblatt in Social Advocacy & Politics, Social Media Read More

Since the success of Barack Obama’s 2008 Social Media campaign, politicians in Switzerland know that the use of Twitter can be an important pillar in a digital campaign strategy. Nevertheless, Twitter still isn’t that popular in Switzerland, and it is still known as an elite network where mainly people from political, journalism/media and communications spaces are online. Some politicians, however, are beginning to realize the strategic potential of using Twitter. Because of the structure of the Twitter network in Switzerland, Twitter can be a good tool to manage relationships and influence journalists and social influencers. Despite its worldwide use, there are barely any research papers about the use of Twitter in Switzerland.  So for our bachelor thesis at the Institute of Mass Communication and Media Research at the University of Zurich, my colleague Nina Rupp and I researched opinion leadership on Twitter within the Swiss parliament members. We investigated if there were different dimensions of online opinion-leadership on Twitter. For our methodology, we tracked data from 107 of the 246 parliament members who had a Twitter account by February 2015. After tracking data with the program R during two three-week periods, we performed a first cluster analysis to discover which…

For many years I have been pushing my colleagues to more fully integrate social media into their advocacy campaigns. While many were using social media to raise awareness about their issues and mobilize activists to take action (with both direct social media appeals and peer-to-peer appeals to send emails to Congress), none were using social media itself to deliver the messages to lawmakers. In 2010 I trained some of my colleagues to use social media to deliver messages to lawmakers, encouraging them to pass specific legislation. That resulted in the ENOUGH Project successfully passing two pieces of legislation that year by mobilizing its activists to post directly on key legislators Facebook pages. In the years since, “social advocacy” has become more common, though still not pervasive. But when it is used, it yields great results. Read a personal story from long-time advocacy organizer Shelley Moskowitz about how she and her team used Twitter in the eleventh hour to catch the attention of a senator and save their campaign in Alan’s post at Social Media Today. __ Alan Rosenblatt, Ph.D. is Sr. VP of Digital Strategy at turner4D and a 20+ year veteran of digital politics.  He writes every other Tuesday for Social Media Today, where…