turner4D | Carpe Colloquium

 

Here is a piece I wrote in 2006 that apparently disappeared from the Internet. Someone asked if I still had it. Lo and behold I do. So here it is. NOTE: This was written 12 years ago. Nothing has been edited since then. _______________________________________ Can you just hear James Earl Jones saying that title?  I can. All jests aside, we are in the midst of a very touchy and serious debate over our rights to petition Congress via email.  There are two key issues at stake here, as has been pointed out by Jeffrey Birnbaum of the Washington Post. First, and most importantly, constituent email to Congress is being obstructed by Congress in two ways.  Technologically, Congress has been implementing webforms and validation processes (for example, CAPCHA codes and Logic Puzzles) that are obstructing the ability of citizens to exercise their First Amendment rights to petition the government in the name of protecting Congress from SPAM.  Behaviorally, Congressional staffers are apparently ignoring and sometimes deleting constituent email because they don’t believe it comes from real constituents. Second, as a result of the technological barriers erected by Congress, there is growing evidence that the ability to deliver email to Congress via…

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The Dr. DigiPol Show has been digging into how Breitbart and Steve Bannon have been deeply involved in shaping politics in Britain, the US and now across Europe. First, Alan and Suzanne explored how Breitbart.com provides a good signal to see where the Trump Administration is going: Then Alan interviews Criminal Justice Professor Paul Leighton about the rise of hate crimes and the Director of HOPE not hate, Nick Lowles, on Breibart’s plans to shape Europe’s future. To watch more episodes of The Dr. DigiPol show and to get notifications of upcoming shows, visit and like DrDigiPolisIN on Facebook.

Check out the latest column from Alan Rosenblatt, our SVP of Digital Strategy, on the importance of including self-publishing into your PR strategy. It is no longer enough to focus only of earned media. Placing stories in the press is great, but many times self-publishing on your blog or a social blogging site can produce more and better targeted readers. From “Social Advocacy and Politics: Earned Media vs. Self-Publishing for Public Affairs”: Since the birth of the public relations industry, placing stories in the media – otherwise known as earned media – has been a central focus of PR professionals and clients. But the truth is, earned media is but one tool for achieving your strategic goals. With the rise of self-publishing platforms – your own website, blogs and social media – the opportunity to put your story out there in an unfiltered form is a persistent option, though there’s been resistance to such self-publishing, especially among PR firms’ clients. But times have changed and self-publishing can often provide a bigger impact than placing a story in the mainstream press. Read the rest of this column here.

Throughout my career I have worn many hats, often at the same time. At the core of this is my passion for my work and my commitment to ensure that whatever I do professionally helps make the world a better place. Which is why I am excited to add my new hat as Director of Digital Research for Lake Research Partners to my haberdashery comprising strategic consulting as SVP of Digital Strategy for turner4D; teaching graduate school at George Washington, American and Johns Hopkins Universities; my SocialMediaToday.com column; and hosting The Dr. DigiPol Show on Shindig.com (on Facebook, too). As the Director of Digital Research for Lake Research Partners, I am once again in a position to pioneer new ways for digital and social media to change politics. Digital and social media turn the historical fiction of the “national conversation” into a reality. The opinions people express on social media provide not only a window into their minds, but also into a better understanding of which opinions they are willing to share in front of their family, friends and peers. This is a rich vein of data that is inadequately considered in political and policy research and strategy. My new…

Posted by Alan Rosenblatt in Company News, featured, Social Media Read More

I am going to go out on a limb and predict that the new Instagram Stories, which competes directly with Snapchat’s Stories, will reduce the need of advocacy and political campaigns to rush to colonize Snapchat. Stories is a feature that allows many people to contribute to a single aggregated thread on Snapchat, and now Instagram. Used with geo-fencing, for example, Stories allow everyone attending a rally or a conference to post to a collective forum on either of these respective platforms. That helps to create not just a sense of interaction with the event organizer, but a real sense of collaboration. For political campaigns, as I have written before, this can go a long way towards improving trust in the candidate and political efficacy. So why does Instagram’s new Stories feature forestall the need to colonize Snapchat? There are several reasons to consider: Instagram and Snapchat both reach the same Millennial audiences that campaigns drool over While Snapchat boasts 150 million users, Instagram has 500 million Instagram, according to the Pew Research Center, is at least as important a social media platform for youth and young adults as Snapchat Unlike Snapchat, which is primarily a peer-to-peer platform designed for private…

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